Shakespeare's Staging
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User Input - User Input
This site currently has been given a Google Page Rank of 6 ("a high GPR value is 5 and above") . We welcome more detailed evaluations, queries, comments, suggestions, and additions relevant to our site, which may be sent to the Director at UCB.  In addition to making appropriate site adjustments on this basis, we also hope to post useful observations about the field more generally for user discussion. The following items illustrate some reactions to this web-site and a variety of its components:

 
1.
"Internet Shakespeare Editions" 

        Rating of shakespearestaging


"The Internet Shakespeare Editions is a non-profit corporation, created by letters patent of the Federal Government of Canada, affiliated with the University of Victoria. The ISE site has introduced an important and exciting new resource: an extensive and growing database of Shakespeare in Performance. Sites awarded a "swan" are recommended for the quality of their content and design:

ONE SWAN: Shakespeare's Staging
This site, maintained by Hugh Richmond at the University of California Berkeley, provides a survey of current information and opinion about staging by registering the best available explorations of the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter. It has extensive image galleries: http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/  "


2. SCOUT REPORT: UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSION-MADISON
      Feb. 20, 2009 -- Vol. 15, No. 7 A Publication of Internet Scout  Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison  Sponsored by U. of Wisconsin - Madison Libraries.

      Shakespeare's Staging   http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/

The University of California at Berkeley's English Department has undertaken the enormous task of presenting "a survey of current information, opinions and visuals about...the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter." Visitors can click on "Performance Galleries" at the top of the homepage to be taken to ten albums of over 900 images.  Some of the topics of the albums that you can link to are "Productions from the Sixteenth through the Twentieth Century", "Productions in Britain 1960-1998", and "Unusual Representations of Shakespeare Performances".  The albums contain items such as playbills, photos and drawings of performances, and photos of the rebuilt Globe Theatre. On the far left side of the homepage, visitors can click on "Videos" to view a documentary series about Elizabethan life, as well as excerpts of performances staged by the Shakespeare Program of UC Berkeley at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre.  The videos can be viewed by "Latest", "Most Viewed", "Highest Rated", and "Featured". Visitors interested in other websites that explore Shakespeare performance will want to click on "Relevant Websites" on the far left side of the homepage, to access a link that has 27 Shakespeare performance related websites. [KMG]

 

3. TeachersFirst.com The web resource by teachers, for teachers:
      Understanding and Working with Gifted Students:

Shakespeare's Staging Grade 11 to 12 - Regents University of California- 9590
      This great site gives serious Shakespeare students something to dig their teeth into. Of particular interest is a full-length, documentary video titled "Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection." The documentary links Spanish and Elizabethan theatres in style of performance, architecture, and background. From the homepage, you can look at galleries (basically online picture albums) of Shakespearean productions from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Clicking on the "Videos" tab will enable you watch short excerpts of plays performed in various venues including open-air theatres. Due to the academic nature of the presentations, this is probably best used with upperclassmen or gifted students who have some familiarity with the Elizabethan Renaissance and Shakespeare. The videos require Flash. You can get it from the TeachersFirst Toolbox.
      In the Classroom: The ideas presented on this site offer imaginative teachers great scope. Using the short videos and/or the albums as jumping off points, students can create their own videos of their own productions. Share the videos on YouTube or another tool such as SchoolTube.  One of the central topics can be the ease or difficulty in staging some of the scenes. Since there are several of the videos where actors describe the experiences playing certain characters as well as short documentaries showing authentic Elizabethan music, dance, etc., students can incorporate their own ideas in making their own scenes more genuine.
      TeachersFirst.com • The web resource by teachers, for teachers. Copyright © 1998, 2008 by The Source for Learning, Inc.


4. "Mr. William Shakespeare and the Internet" comments:


"The latest edition of Mr. William Shakespeare and the Internet has tried to bring together here sites which will give insight into the mounting of authentic Elizabethan productions. These sites could all fall under the general rubric of 'staging.'

For a thorough-going overview see:
     1. Shakespeare's Staging, from U.C. Berkeley.
     2. Shakespearean Stage History from 1660 onwards
     [by Bradley Berens: participant in UCB Shakespeare Program]


5. BRITISH UNIVERSITIES FILM AND VIDEO COUNCIL
University of Cambridge: Professional English Online
France 24.com     Islam Channel  BBC Programmes 
Manchester University   IR Project Blog    Open University View The Reel                   Russia Today  TeachToday

Some Recommended Websites:
Shakespeare Staging

This website, hosted by the Shakespeare Program at the University of California, Berkeley seeks to provide videos, still images, weblinks, current information, and discussion about the staging of Shakeseare's plays over the centuries. The site is subject to continuous revision and expansion, and at the beginning of 2009 contains over 1,000 still images and video extracts of live performances concerning Shakespeare. [Relevance:] Any Drama    http://shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu/
 

6. Visits to shakespearestaging as of 6/30/12:

Browser Visits since 3/16/2005                                    660,642

Browser Hits since 3/16/2005:                                  2,390,176

Playings of Videos since 5/16/08:                               104,172

Most popular plays   (visits to single-play bibliographies)                              

1         King Lear  8862

2        A Midsummer Night's Dream 8571

3         Romeo and Juliet  7757

4        Macbeth   6867

5        The Tempest   6302      

6        Hamlet   5533

7        Othello   3608

8        Richard III   3499

9        The Taming of the Shrew   3134

10      Much Ado About Nothing  2985

 

7. USERS’ COMMENTS ON  shakespearestaging IN 2007

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8. Inivited Reviews (abbreviated where suggestions adopted).

A. Dr. Philippa Kelly: Review of 'shakespearestaging' (January 2008)

The home page for ‘Shakespearestaging’ does not prepare the viewer for the extraordinary wealth of visual information that is available on this remarkable site. The scope of the site is outstanding. The slideshow capacity for most albums also adds great flexibility for those using the site for research purposes or for purposes of general curiosity.

Album 1. Since this is the introductory album, I am wondering whether you might provide a little more basic infrastructure to some captions.[in progress]
Album 2 The photo collection from the seventeenth to the twentieth century provides a remarkable resource. All of the key figures in stage history are collected here, and for students, many of whom are used to scanning quickly through massively detailed accounts of stage history, these photos will open new vistas for really experiencing the history of performance. For example, the photos of Edmund Kean allow us to imagine the spryness of his Hamlet and the shock of a diminutive Lear staggering on-stage under the weight of Cordelia.
Album 3. This album is fascinating in its display of productions through the nineteenth century. It might be useful to date all of the photos in the captions, just for ease of access.[done]
Album 4: again, this album is fascinating, with photos of Shakespeare’s portrait as well as various key actors in Shakespeare’s time. The wonderfully concise and informative captions are invaluable. I know I keep harping on about this: but captions like this one for photo 9 are priceless: concise, informative, imaginatively put together:
‘Woffington was the great early love of Garrick and a mercurial actress. She began  her successes as Ophelia and collapsed on stage in 1757 after playing Rosalind, never acting again. She excelled in comedy and the latter kind of   "breeches" part, in which as a pretty woman she plausibly pretended to be a man - perhaps because she had a rather harsh voice.’
Album 5 This album provides a panoply of the twentieth century greats, including Olivier, Gielgud, Hepburn, Smith, Ashcroft. Particularly inspired is the pairing of 17 and 18, displaying consecutively as Othello Paul Robeson and a blackface Olivier. Again, it might be useful to date all the photos.
Album 6 provides a wonderfully comprehensive alphabetically arranged set of photos from the twentieth century British stage.
Album 7 provides an informative and imaginative scattering of photos from productions that did not have a natural place in the collections above (e.g. European productions, posters and drawings.)
Album 8 Would it be possible to turn album 8 into a useful archive for the California Shakespeare Theater. Students and potential sponsors for the CST could be directed to your site. [doubled in size]
Album 9 This album displays a wealth of experience, knowledge and dedication on the part of Hugh and Velma Richmond. 9.1 catalogues their travels all over Europe in accumulating photos of theatres that preceded London’s original Globes as well as the New Globe. But this is not a tedious album put together by tireless enthusiasts: on the contrary, it is a collection that displays, in every photograph, clarity, thoughtfulness, astuteness and sound pedagogical judgment. Each photograph (as with the previous albums) is captioned with a concise information-bite that tells us why the photo has been selected and what its relevance is to the Globe and to performance issues in general. We see places like the Roman Theatre in Orange, Provence, the Civic Theatre in Taormine, Sicily, the Palladio Theatre in Vicenza, Italy, even the Tower of Southwark Cathedral from which Hollar drew his view of London (and where Gower is buried, to become the chorus of the play, Pericles; and where, incidentally, they tell us is also buried Edmund, the namesake for one of Shakespeare’s most malevolently self-serving characters.) We see a street-setting reenactment of a Mystery Play, with the minimal scenery and highly symbolic iconography that preceded Elizabethan staging (one can feel the excitement of the theatre coming to life in the street, which gives a terrific sense of the psychology that led into the Elizabethan/Jacobean devotion to theatre that rivaled their devotion to sermons.) A picture of Drake’s ship, the Golden Hinde, helps us to imagine the setting that Shakespeare had in mind when he wrote scenes that take place on-board ships. The representation of Queen Elizabeth 1 is marvelously juxtaposed with a modern actress playing Queen Elizabeth.

9.2 shows us the various stages in the rebuilding of the Globe, and illustrates the magnitude of the rebuilding process, from the skeleton of the structure to the thatching of the roof. 9.3 depicts some early uses of the rebuilt Globe, with a deft insertion of the UC Berkeley’s Much Ado cast to show the scope of the stage, as well as some very useful photos of the dimensions of the stage space and of the audience space. In the album devoted to the rebuilt Globe, I loved the thoughtful inclusion of a photo of morning light and its effect on staging, in contrast to the afternoon light that would, in the original, have fallen on most performances. There are photos illustrating the difference in staging positions that need to be learned by actors and directors. In 9.5, it is fascinating to see also the UC Berkeley group that Professor Richmond took over to the New Globe site and to imagine the challenges and excitements entailed in staging Much Ado.


Dr. Philippa Kelly lives in California and is a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the University of New South Wales. She taught for several years in Australia before coming to America, She completed a Ph.D. and post-doctorate in Shakespeare. She has been awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to U.C. Berkeley, a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship to Bellagio and a Walter and Eliza Hall Fellowship to the University of Oxford. With Ron Bedford and Lloyd Davis she published 'Early Modern Autobiography: Theories, Genres, Practices' (Michigan University Press) in September 2006, and will publish 'Early Modern English Lives' in 2008 (Ashgate Press). Besides working on theories of individuality in early modern England, she has also published extensively on Shakespeare and in particular 'King Lear' which she edited for the Bell Shakespeare series (Halstead Press, 2002), and she has also contributed to the University of Cambridge University Press ‘King Lear’ CD-ROM. She was dramaturge for the California Shakespeare Theatre production of ‘King Lear’ in 2007 and continues in that role for the 2009 season. She has been Australian National University: Research School of Humanities Research School Visiting Fellow for 2008.

B. Professor Joel Altman: Review of website “Shakespeare’s Staging,” (Jan. 2008)

The website as a whole is extraordinarily impressive, providing a long historical and pictorial perspective on theaters and stages relevant to the development of Shakespearean performance.  In addition, there are abundant performance bibliographies and many useful internet links to other performance sites.  I have no doubt that this website must already be of considerable interest to students and scholars of Shakespeare and will be of increasing value as it expands and is edited.

Album 1.1 is less than satisfying because it is a miscellany and somewhat redundant.  They appear elsewhere on the site and are not needed here [1.1 is twice more visited than others in the sub-gallery, so it has been kept, but ref. to Gallery 9 added].  Albums 1.2-8 are fine, accomplishing what they set out to do.  Actual dates of performance, however, would help [done].

Album 2, “Productions from the Seventeenth to Twentieth Century,” is well-organized by play and character, enabling interesting comparisons, and the images are carefully dated.  The only seventeenth-century actor shown, however, is Edward Kynaston .  It would help if the image from Kirkman’s “The Wits” (1662) was included in this album
[Alleyn,  Betterton, Burbage, Lowyn, and "Wits" image added].

Album 3, “Productions from 1838 to 1914,” is generally excellent.  The images are strong and detailed, It would help viewers if you provided actual or approximate dates [added].
 
Album 4, “Shakespeare in 1900,” is necessarily eclectic, given its source.  It is a very interesting collection, nonetheless.  Even if the dates of performance are not known, the dates of birth and death usually are, so they would be useful additions [done].
 
Album 5, “ Productions from 1900,” is a great collection, emphasing close-ups of actors and groupings.  Again, though, dates are missing, and in this case they can be easily supplied, and should be [done].  Suggestion: place the image of Ada Rehan’s Katharina just after the opening image of Olivier as Katherina--it will be more a more effective contrast--and decide what spelling you want to use [done].

Album 6, “Productions in Britain 1960-68,” continues to provide fine dramatic images of the plays, and this time does supply the dates.  Splendid job.

Album 7, “Other Representations,” is a gallimaufry of images, all quite interesting, dated only sporadically.  In this case, it is be especially important to date the images, since they are frequently non-contemporary representations [added].

Album 8, “An American Shakespeare Stage,” has some fine shots of productions of Much Ado and Julius Caesar at the California Shakespeare Festival Theatre.  There are dates, but here one would like to see the names of the actors, several of whom are longtime regulars at CalShakes and merit being acknowledged in print [mostly done].

Album 9, “Origins, Construction, and Use of the Rebuilt Globe Theatre,” is a multi-sub-album site and I will review each sub-album in order of its appearance.

Album 9.1: “Theatres before the Globe.”  This album contains stunning photographs of Greek and Roman theaters, as well as the theater in Almagro, Spain and the Teatro Olympico in Vicenza. From the ancient world there are also mosaics of actors and dancers.  No dates are supplied, and should be.  The same must be said for images 44, 45, 46, 47-54, 56-58, 61, 64-66.  

Album 9.2: “Rebuilding Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre.”  A fine series of images showing the building of the Shakespeare’s Globe from wooden model to working theater.  I think the arrangement should be changed.  The album should begin with a connected series of images of the model, currently 1, 6, 8, 9, and end with the shot of Wanamaker and the model (5). This should be followed by the images of the environing area in the 1990s, currently 2 (edit the word “copy” in the caption), 3, 4, 5, 10.  Then continue with the construction pictures, currently 11-24.  Omit the model of the Inigo Jones Theater and save it for the spot before the photograph of the exterior of the theater in Album 9.3.  And please supply dates.

Album 9.3: “Early Uses of the Rebuilt Globe Theatre.”  Images 1-7 are fine.  Provide some architectural detail for image 8 of the restaurant building--Victorian, Edwardian? [done: Dutch Renaissance?]. Place Inigo Jones model before photo of exterior [done].  Parlous state of HMR in hardhat OK in image 11, but in image 12 add “in lowest gallery” to indicate location [done].  Sequence 12-25, showing UCB cast for MA in action, is fine, but images 22-25 should be dated, since these appear to be taken at a later stage of construction.

Album 9.4: “The Completed Globe Theatre.”  All images splendid

Album 9.5: “Much Ado at the Globe 1996.”  My sense is that this sub-album should be positioned before the current sub-album 9.4 because the latter reveals the Globe in its completed state, and this one does not [done].  It does a fine job of showing the way the stage was used to enhance scenes of spying, hiding, plotting, intimate revelation, etc., and the pitfalls of static staging when those huge pillars get in the sightlines.  I disagree with the lesson drawn from image 21, that Claudio near the edge of the stage looks insecure and weak.  In this shot he may, but that is largely because he’s so far from the audience that he is isolated; if the yard were filled with groundlings in whom he was confiding, I doubt if he would give the same impression.  So the image here may be misleading.  Over-all, however, these pictures offer a useful primer in how to make maximum use of a bare raised stage with nothing but doors and pillars.  Image 46 should end the album, while 47-48 ought to be inserted into the current sub-album 9.4.

In conclusion, the entire website is extremely ambitious, eminently useful, and worthy of careful study.  Album 9, because of its contemporary interest, is especially exciting and practical.  In addition to the thorough copy-editing, I would recommend that the director do some discreet pruning among the images throughout the site, to avoid redundancy, even though some overlapping is probably unavoidable.  And I also recommend that all paragraph captions be reset flush left; having each line centered makes reading difficult.  The galleries and albums are easily navigable, though on my screen several of the characters indicating major subsites, on the running banner below “Shakespeare’s Staging: Shakespeare’s Performance and his Globe Theatre,” are invisible.  If this is not my computer’s idiosyncrasy, it needs to be fixed.

             Joel B. Altman  Professor of English EmeritusProfessor at the Graduate School, UCB   January 19, 2008

 

9.  Faculty Comments

Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2008 From: Ron Bedford
Subject: shakespearestaging

Dear Professor Richmond,

Greetings from Australia!  My dear friend and colleague Philippa Kelly has just alerted me - with some excitement - to your shakespearestaging website, urging me to look at it.  Which of course I have, and it is a revelation. It is wonderful to know that there exists such an amazing resource, and so carefully and skillfully assembled. It is a true treasure trove, and will be invaluable to everyone in that vast audience  interested in theatre and in Shakespeare, and I'll do everything I can to alert others here to its astonishing  riches.

Before I looked at the site Philippa also told me she was doing a report on it for 'Hugh'. I asked 'Hugh who?', and was delighted to discover it was that same H.M. Richmond whose The Christian Revolutionary: John Milton I had bought in 1974, which I read with such enthusiasm, and which encouraged me even more to pursue reading, thinking and writing about Milton. Thank you too for that!All good wishes.

Ron Bedford, Professor of English, University of New England  Armidale NSW 2351 

                                                  **************

To: Director Hugh  Richmond:

I found your site a wonderful surprise! I was particularly delighted to read your article on R&J and Lope de Vega's version. To the best of my knowledge, the first modern public performance of Lope's play in English in this country (anywhere?) was the staged reading we did in spring 1996 at Unison Arts & Learning Center in New Paltz, NY. using the actors' chairs as sets. We called the play “Castles and Mountains”.  We did more the following year with a slightly different cast.  The cover of my Carleton translation is actually a drawing of Monica Antonelli as Julia and Roberto Romani as Roselo (our second).

I would still dearly love to see a Renaissance theater festival with parallel performances, not only of R&J and C&M, but of the two versions of the Duchess of Malfi story (my translation of Lope's “The Duchess of Malfi’s Syteward” - apparently still one of Carleton's best sellers!) and the two Henry VIII plays (I believe Kenneth Muir did a translation of Calderon's “The English Schism”). I failed to get John Neville to do it, or Joe Papp, or Peter Brook or Jonathan Miller or even Tony Randall, but that doesn't mean it isn't a great idea! Again, fascinating site!

Cynthia Rodriguez-Badendyck 16 March 2010

                                                  **************    

Dear Professor Richmond

I was very glad to see the excellent web site of the Shakespeare Program.  I am currently a professional equity actor in New York City and teach theatre around the country as visiting professor: I am now at Loyola University (while rehearsing Capulet in NYC to open in New Canaan, CT in June). I am the one who played Falstaff in Merry Wives (as currently seen on the web site’s images and video of the play.)  I still tell my students about your work.  Thanks for all the great experiences. Sincerely   Arion Alston [Falstaff on site Home Page and in Gallery 1.5; Theseus in Gallery 1.3]

                                                  *****************

Thanks for working on this great resource!. Professor Aaron Meyerowitz, Florida Atlantic University.

                                            *************

If you are not familiar with Hugh Richmond's Shakespeare's Staging web site, I think you might find it an amazing resource for actors' doing their own dramaturgical research.  Kurt Daw, Professor of Theatre Arts, San Francisco StaTe University.

                                                        **************

“This website is one of my favorites on Shakespeare . . . and is an important one.”  Georgianna Ziegler,  Louis B. Thalheimer Head of Reference at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

 

                                                        

10. Current Student Evaluations 
Below are evaluations of the Shakespeare Program's most recent projects at  U.C.B. - courses taught for the Osher Institute (Winter terms, 2008, 2009, 2011).

A.

Course: Shakespeare & Politics- H. Richmond, W. 2008 U.CB. Osher I.

Options               Strongly Agree   Agree    Neutral      No 

Well Planned          15                       9                0                 

Clear Aims              16                       5                3              

Intelligible              17                       6                1                 

Well Taught            12                       9                2              

New Ideas              12                       9                2            1    

Totals                      76%                  32%           7%       .3%    

 

B. Lectures on Shakespeare’s Tragedies  for U.C.B.  Osher Institute
Evaluations for Winter 2009   Instructor: Hugh Macrae Richmond

 

Broadened Understanding of subject     95.4% 

Incentive to learn more of subject        88.1%

Personal insights gained                       71.8%

Well organized                                      93.2%
Good with mature audience                  95.3%
Engaging lecturer                                  93.2%
Lively discussions                                 81.4%
Responsive to questions                        92.7%

Good accompanying materials              91.9%
Good media presentations                     100%

Take another course from instructor      93.0%          

 

C. Course at U.C. B. Osher Life Long Learning Institute

Sovereignty & the Individual in Shakespeare

27 Jan.-1 March 2011

The course covers three major Shakespeare tragedies: Hamlet, King Lear, and Coriolanus,seeking to establish their relevance to modern concepts of the state and of its authority.

1.  Instructor feedback

I found the instructors:

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

No Opinion

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Count

Well-organized

 80.0% (20)

20.0% (5)

0.0% (0)

0.0% (0)

0.0% (0)

25

Comfortable with mature audience

96.0% (24)

4.0% (1)

0.0% (0)

0.0% (0)

0.0% (0)

25

Engaging lecturers

92.0% (23)

8.0% (2)

0.0% (0)

0.0% (0)

0.0% (0)

25

Encouraged discussions

72.0% (18)

24.0% (6)

4.0% (1)

0.0% (0)

0.0% (0)

25

Responsive to questions

87.0% (20)

13.0% (3)

0.0% (0)

0.0% (0)

0.0% (0)

23

 2. What did you think of the accompanying materials for the class? answered question:  27 

                                      Helpful          Not applicable       Not helpful     Response
Handouts                     100.0% (27)      0.0% (0)                0.0% (0)          27

Media presentation      100.0%
(27)      0.0% (0 )               0.0% (0)           27

 

D. Course at UCB Osher Life-Long Learning Institute, W.2012

" Shakespeare's Roman Trilogy: Julius Caesar, Antony & Clepatra, Cymbeline"  Instructors: P.Kelley, H. Richmond

 Course Evaluation, Winter 2012

                             Strongly Agree / Agree/ Neutral / Total

Well-organized

66.7% (28)

         28.6%               (12)

         2.4%               (1)

            42

 

Good with mature audience

88.4% (38)

         11.6%               (5)

 

            43

 

An engaging lecturer

90.7% (39)

          9.3%                  (4)

 

            43

 

Encouraged lively discussions

71.4% (30)

         21.4%               (9)

        7.1%                (3)

            42

 

Responsive to question

78.6% (33)    

         21.4%               (9)

 

            42

 

Helpful Media Presentation

100% (44)

 

 

        44

 

Would Take Instructors Again:95.5% (42) No:4.5%(2)    44                      
Should Course Be Re-offered:97.7% (42) No:2.3% (1) 43                                                                                                                                              

                          ***************


11. THE NEW VIDEO GALLERY AT shakespearestaging

A new video collection at shakespearestaging is being developed as of 16 May 2008, and has by now (3/29/10) been visited  67,641 times. We have added significant excerpts from neglected plays not available on video (Henry VI, Pericles, Two Noble Kinsmen, Henry VIII, etc.) as well as other more classic moments. At present, the excerpts also include scenes from the Much Ado performed by the U.C.B. Shakespeare Program at the rebuilt Globe Theatre in London U.K. on 15 July 1996, and from various other presentations including the following documentaries, here rated by American and  British distributors:

A. TMW Media:   Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Restored

alt 

"...will be of interest to English literature and drama students at high school and college levels. Recommended." - Library Journal, September 1998

3 Stars! "This video excels as a teaching tool for students of Shakespeare and drama"

"appropriately tinged with apprehension and excitement about the Bard on such hallowed ground." - Video Librarian Magazine, July-August 1998

"...advanced dramatic arts classes may enjoy experiencing the planning, rehearsals, scenes from the play, and post-production discussions of the Berkeley Shakespeare Program students." - Video Library Journal September 1998

Celebrate Shakespeare's work in the original setting and open air acoustics for which he wrote his greatest plays. Witness this historically significant production of Much Ado About Nothing , the first recorded Elizabethan production on the newly rebuilt Globe stage in London. Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Restored video documents eighteen months of planning, rehearsal, location work, and post-production by the University of California at Berkeley Shakespeare Program, culminating in the performance of one of Shakespeare's greatest plays. Visit the fully operational restored Globe Theatre on the Bankside of the river Thames, near its original site and experience how the reconstructed Elizabethan Theatre provides a venue for teaching and studying Shakespeare's plays in the ultimate authentic performance setting. Color,  30 Min. VHS & DVD Viewers Guide Included. B40

 

YOU TUBE: Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Restored, www.tmwmedia.com  Witness this historically significant production of Much Ado About Nothing, the first recorded Elizabethan production on the stage of the rebuilt Shakespeare Globe Theatre in London. 1 year ago: 3,055 views  4.5 stars out of 5

                              **************

B. TMW MEDIA:   Shakespeare & the Spanish Connectio

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        Join the Shakespeare Program of the University of California at Berkeley on an in-depth journey to the heart of William Shakespeare’s plays.  Simple but brilliant reenactments of plays from both cultures, featuring beautiful costumes and accessible acting make both worlds interesting and easy to understand despite the barriers of language.Shakespeare & the Spanish Connection is a must for students,teachers & Shakespeare scholars of all ages.
        Experience the plays of traditional Spanish theater firsthand and see how they parallel many of Shakespeare’s most famous works. See how these plays were brought to early California with the founding of the missions, and how many of these plays are still performed and remain an integral part of Spanish culture in modern-day America. See the archetypal “stock characters” of traditional Spanish theater manifest themselves in Shakespeare’s plays, from the black hat villain (Don John in “Much Ado About Nothing”) to the nag (Juliet’s Nurse in “Romeo and Juliet”) to the foolish braggart (Falstaff in “Henry IV).    30 min. B405 DVD

TeachersFirst.com • The web resource by teachers, for teachers: "
Of particular interest is a full-length, documentary video titled "Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection." The documentary links Spanish and Elizabethan theatres in style of performance, architecture, and background."

UCTV PROGRAMS: 
Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection
*****  
First Air: 9/5/2005  28 minutes
This documentary covers key relationships between the two theatre traditions of Spain and England, including varied materials from performances in New Mexico and California, of theatre excerpts from Shakespeare, Lope de Vega,  Calderon, and Alarcon, mostly by theatre professionals. It has visuals from Spain (the Almagro Theatre, Velazquez paintings from the Prado), England (the restored Globe Theatre, National Portrait Gallery), and historical data from the South West, including accounts of community drama in New Mexico and California. (#11017) K-12 Educational Standards  ©2009 Regents of the University of California.

Izguit.info
This is a new directory devoted to everything Spanish. Izguit also includes articles and international links to other sites which share a love for the country of Spain. We hope our directory will soon become a crucial tool in the English language to all lovers of Spain.

Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection

This documentary covers key relationships between the two theatre traditions of Spain and England, including varied materials from performances in New Mexico and California, of theatre excerpts from Shakespeare, Lope de Vega, Calderon, and Alarcon, mostly by theatre professionals. It has visuals from Spain (the Almagro Theatre, Velazquez paintings from the Prado), England (the restored Globe Theatre, National Portrait Gallery), and historical data from the South West, including accounts of community drama in New Mexico and California. [9/2005] [Humanities] [Arts and Music] [Show ID: 11017]

 

YouTube Shakespeare & the Spanish Connection: 12/08:

1,122 views*****

***************

C. FILMS MEDIA GROUP: Shakespeare and the Globe 

alt 

This program artfully brings together a treasury of visual resources to retrace Shakespeare's life and work. Included are the landmarks of Elizabethan London associated with his plays; depictions of the structure and operations of the Globe Theatre (including scenes from Laurence Olivier’s Henry V ); historical sources of the plays in art and architecture surviving today; theatrical traditions that influenced the playwright, like folk festivals and medieval dances; and sites associated with Shakespeare's family and origins. Some of the major dramatic motifs, like the Braggart Warrior, are shown through reenactment of sections of the plays. Produced by Hugh Richmond, University of California-Berkeley; directed by Paul Shepard


Reviews & Awards

"This excellent introduction to Shakespeare puts his plays into perspective against the times he lived in and the theatrical traditions upon which he built."—Library Journal

"A concise and accurate presentation of Shakespeare and his plays as they were in the Elizabethan era."—Media & Methods

"This production will inspire students and drama buffs."—Booklist

Honorable Mention, National Educational Film & Video Festival


                          *************

 12. Recent Citations of "Shakespeare's Staging"

 

A. Intute:

Intute Executive at the University of Manchester U.K.
Intute Arts and Humanities:
led by the University of Oxford
                            & Manchester Metropolitan Univers
ity,
U.K.

Best Sites of the Web in Arts and Humanities:
Shakespeare's Staging

This is the website of Shakespeare’s Staging, a project run by the English Department of the University of California at Berkeley. The website contains information, opinions and visuals about Shakespearean performances and staging. It explores “the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter”. There is a performance bibliography broken down into three sections: during Shakespeare’s time; after Shakespeare’s time and individual plays. The performance gallery shows still images of performances concerning Shakespeare from the 16th century to the present. One can also view video extracts of performances.
  URL     http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/ [English]
Keywords - plays; playwrights; British; theaters; drama; stages; sets; scenography; costume design; directors; scenographers; audiences; Shakespeare, 1564-1616; audience expectations; theatre designers; theatres;
Classification; Theatre and Drama Theatre and Drama > Production and Performance > Acting;  English Studies >  Theatre Studies.   
Periods: 16th C.; 17th C.; 18th C.; 19th C.; 20th C. (1900 - 1945); 20th C. (1946 - 1999);
Responsibility: Hugh Macrae Richmond, (Project Director)  Univ. of California, English Dept, Berkeley, USA   
 

B. Central  Jersey Regional Library Cooperative
Phyllis’ Favorites   Name: Phyllis Anker Location: United States
These postings are provided courtesy of CJRLC (Central  Jersey Regional Library  Cooperative). http://www.cjrlc.org/
 

Shakespeare's Staging
Site & review found on TeachersFirst.com  Grades 11 to 12. Thurs., Oct. 16, 2008
Shakespeare's Staging - Regents University of California
http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/


This great site gives serious Shakespeare students something to dig their teeth into. Of particular interest is a full-length, documentary video titled "Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection." The documentary links Spanish and Elizabethan theatres in style of performance, architecture, and background. From the homepage, you can look at galleries (basically online picture albums) of Shakespearean productions from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Clicking on the "Videos" tab will enable you watch short excerpts of plays performed in various venues including open air theatres. Due to the academic nature of the presentations, this is probably best used with upperclassmen or gifted students who have some familiarity with the Elizabethan Renaissance and Shakespeare.
Full review and suggestions on using this site “In the Classroom”: http://www.teachersfirst.com/single.cfm?id=9590
 

 

C.  UNIVERSITY OF HONGKONG
       
Published by Arts Faculty Librarian under Arts
        Tags: English literature, Shakespeare, theatre performance

Shakespeare’s Staging Berkeley
Visitors can click on “Performance Galleries” at the top of the homepage to be taken to ten albums of over 900 images.  Some of the topics of the albums that you can link to are “Productions from the Sixteenth through the Twentieth Century”, “Productions in Britain 1960-1998” and “Unusual Representations of Shakespeare Performances”.  The albums contain items such as playbills, photos and drawings of performances, and photos of the rebuilt Globe Theatre. Visitors can click on “Videos” to view a documentary series about Elizabethan life, as well as excerpts of performances staged by the Shakespeare Program of UC Berkeley at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. Visitors interested in other websites that explore Shakespeare performance will want to click on “Relevant Websites” on the far left side of the homepage, to access a link that has 27 Shakespeare performance related websites.  

 

D. Network for Instructional TV, Inc.

STUDY SITES: THE BEST OF THE WEB FOR STUDENTS


Shakespeare's Staging: Grades 11 to 12  (Regents University of California)
This great site gives serious Shakespeare students something to dig their teeth into. Of particular interest is a full-length, documentary video titled "Shakespeare and the Spanish Connection." The documentary links Spanish and Elizabethan theatres in style of performance, architecture, and background. From the homepage, you can look at galleries (basically online picture albums) of Shakespearean productions from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Clicking on the "Videos" tab will enable you watch short excerpts of plays performed in various venues including open air theatres. Due to the academic nature of the presentations, this is probably best used with upperclassmen or gifted students who have some familiarity with the Elizabethan Renaissance and Shakespeare. 9590  Copyright © 2001 by Network for Instructional TV, Inc.
 

E. THE GLOBAL ELECTRONIC CONFERENCE

Selected Guide to Shakespeare on the Internet 

Revised 16 November 2008.  Compiled by Hardy M. Cook, Editor of SHAKSPER

 

The  first site in the Visual/Performance Resources categories I will cite is the University of California at Berkeley‘s Shakespeare’s Staging. The Shakespeare Program in the  English Department of the University of California has for thirty-five years been concerned with Shakespeare in performance and the rebuilding of Shakespeare‘s Globe Theatre. This site provides a survey of current information and opinion about such staging by registering the best available explorations of the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter. It is organized into Performance Bibliographies and Performance Galleries and is under continuous revision and expansion.

    Visual Performance Resources (5 listed in this order):

     Shakespeare's Staging (U. of CA)
      http://shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu/

    Designing Shakespeare (incorporating King Lear Performance Photographs Collection) 

    Shakespeare's World, includes Shakespeare and the Players and Shakespeare Illustrated

    The Cleveland Press Shakespeare Photographs, 1870-1982 (Lesley Ellen Jorbin)

    An International Database of Shakespeare on Film, Radio and Television
    

 

F.   NANONEWS: The monthly NanoNews was created to serve the information needs of business, government, academic, and public communities.

Shakespeare's staging
| 12.02.2009 03:00
This is the website of Shakespeare’s Staging, a project run by the English Department of the University of California at Berkeley. The website contains information, opinions and visuals about Shakespearean performances and staging. It explores “the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter.” There is a performance bibliography broken down into three sections: during Shakespeare’s time; after Shakespeare’s time; and individual plays. The performance gallery shows still images of performances concerning Shakespeare from the 16th century to the present. One can also view video extracts of performances. 

 
G. Culture Watch Archives

Senior Women Web:  News and Issues Current Reading Links:  Politics Government Media Legal Learning Women of Note Culture & Arts button: Culture and Arts; Culture Watch:

Consider This: Shakespeare's Staging Online

Those of us who are voluntarily nested in their homes in front of a computer screen (after a lifetime of leaving home to commute to a city like New York), are happy to find websites that take us out and about quite figuratively.
One such destination is the University of California, Berkeley site that celebrates Shakespeare's Staging. The stated goal of this site is to provide: "a survey of current information, opinions and visuals about ... the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter."
The Performance Galleries section allows viewers to explore ten albums of more than 900 images, such as Productions from the Sixteenth to the Twentieth Century, Productions in Britain 1960-1998 (with As You like It, 1961; starring as Rosalind, Vanessa Redgrave), and Unusual Representations of Shakespeare Performances. Several pages of performance videos are available for downloading.

Page One, Culture Watch Archives  ©2009 Joan L. Cannon for Senior Women Web


H. Middlebury College Libraries
Research by Subject: Theatre

Web Sites:
Shakespeare's Staging

Unrestricted Resource Resource contains images of Shakespeare's performance and his Globe Theatre
               * Performance Bibliographies       * Performance Galleries

Shakespeare in performance is now a core interest for all Shakespeareans: students, scholars, theatre professionals, and general audiences - anyone with a love of Shakespeare.  We seek to provide a survey of current information, opinions and visuals about such staging by registering the best available explorations of the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter. The site is under continuous revision and expansion, currently involving additions to our 1,000 still images, in the form of numerous video extracts of live performances concerning Shakespeare.

 

I. Northwestern University.
        Library Home  »  LibGuides Home  »  English: Early Modern.
        Last update: Apr 09, 2009 URL:http://libguides.northwestern.edu/content.php?pid=16555

Print Guide:   Shakespeare   

 
1. Guide to Articles and Books
* World Shakespeare Bibliography (Shakespeare Quarterly) Provides annotated entries for books, articles, book reviews, dissertations, theatrical productions, reviews, and  scholarly and popular materials on Shakespeare since 1966.
  2. Plays:   * Riverside Shakespeare  The complete text of the Riverside edition of the works of William Shakespeare: [Standard text for concordance references:] users  may browse  individual works or search for words and phrases, both in individual and groups of works.
3. Reference Tools: * Dictionary of Shakespeare (Oxford)
                                * Dictionary of Shakespeare (Credo)
                                * Oxford Companion to Shakespeare

4. Shakespeare in Performance
:   * Shakespeare Staging - Home.  U.C. Berkeley provides a survey of current information, opinions and visuals about such staging by registering the best available explorations of the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries.
5. Library:   * Folger Shakespeare Library (Catalog to Shakeperiana)

 
J.  Ministère de l’Education Nationale (La France)


AGRÉGATION 2009 Programme Responsable d'année : Denise Ginfray
Cours et bibliographies:  Shakespeare: King Lear


Mises en Scène: Théâtre
228) Cahiers Élisabéthains (1972— Montpellier, Université Paul-Valéry) a publié de très nombreux comptes  rendus de mises en scènes récentes de King Lear (voir  index  tous les dix numéros) ;

229) Voir également l’URL ci-dessous qui donne de très nombreuses références à  des comptes rendus de mises en scène de King Lear :
http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=76=220


K.    The University of Exeter U.K.
Academic Services homepage    Library > Internet Resources     
Library Intute Search Results

Shakespeare's staging
This is the website of Shakespeare’s Staging, a project run by the English Department of the University of California at Berkeley. The website contains information, opinions and visuals about Shakespearean performances and staging. It explores “the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter”. There is a performance bibliography broken down into three sections: during Shakespeare’s time; after Shakespeare’s time and individual plays. The performance gallery shows still images of performances concerning Shakespeare from the 16th century to the present. One can also view video extracts of performances.

Language: English    Author: Hugh Macrae Richmond (Project Director), English Department
Publisher:  University of California, Berkeley (Publisher),English Department  Format: HTML  URL: http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/
Country of origin: United States  Subsections: Theatre and Drama; English  Arts and Humanities   Record last updated: 2009-02-04


L. Spotlight!  
E-news from Theatrefolk

Issue 6 - Shake Up Your Shakespeare


If you're looking for a book on a certain Shakespeare play, check out this link. It will take you to a page called Shakespeare's Staging. Click on Performance bibliography, then on individual plays, then which ever play you wish to learn more on and you'll get a list of books (with a focus on performance) for that specific play.

There is also a gallery section with pictures and drawings. And, in their relevant websites section, they have 22 Shakespeare websites listed. A lot to choose from!
http://shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu  

 
M . University of California at Davis

       Literatures in English Blog

This blog was created by the Literatures in English Bibliographer at UC Davis. Visit regularly for library news, research suggestions, e-resource recommendations and tips, and other information for scholars of English-language literature. Readers are invited to suggest ways to make this blog as useful as possible to English-language literature scholars at UC Davis.

RESOURCE: Shakespeare's Staging Posted by Roberto C. Delgadillo  February 20, 2009
Shakespeare's Staging   http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/
The University of California at Berkeley's English Department has undertaken the enormous task of presenting "a survey of current information, opinions and visuals about...the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter." Visitors can click on "Performance Galleries" at the top of the homepage to be taken to ten albums of over 900 images. Some of the topics of the albums that you can link to are "Productions from the Sixteenth through the Twentieth Century", "Productions in Britain 1960-1998", and "Unusual Representations of Shakespeare Performances". The albums contain items such as playbills, photos and drawings of performances, and photos of the rebuilt Globe Theatre. On the far left side of the homepage, visitors can click on "Videos" to view a documentary series about Elizabethan life, as well as excerpts of performances staged by the Shakespeare Program of UC Berkeley at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre. The videos can be viewed by "Latest", "Most Viewed", "Highest Rated", and "Featured". Visitors interested in other websites that explore Shakespeare performance will want to click on "Relevant Websites" on the far left side of the homepage, to access a link that has 27 Shakespeare performance related websites.  

 

N.  UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY, BERKELEY
       http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/doemoff/english/sources.html
     Research Tools for English and American Literature

Use these research tools to find information related to English and American   Literature from sources such as scholarly articles, books and encyclopedias.

A. Web Gateways and Search Engines
Broad, subject-related sites and subject-specific search engines available without restriction on the World Wide Web including:

Shakespeare's Staging: Shakespeare's Performance and His Globe Theatre
Created by Hugh Richmond, distinguished scholar, this site concentrates on Shakespeare in performance. Currently the site has two main sections; Performance Bibliography gives written responses to staging of Shakespeare, and the Performance Gallery, a visual outline of approaches to staging Shakespeare. The site also has links to other relevant websites.

 

O. Bradford College Libraries (Bradford UK)

Shakespeare's staging http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/
Description: This is the website of Shakespeare’s Staging, a project run by the English Department of the University of California at Berkeley. The website contains information, opinions and visuals about Shakespearean performances and staging. It explores “the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter”. There is a performance bibliography broken down into three sections: during Shakespeare’s time; after Shakespeare’s time and individual plays. The performance gallery shows still images of performances concerning Shakespeare from the 16th century to the present. One can also view video extracts of performances.
 

P. TouchstoneCo-operation and Partnership among:  
      University of Birmingham,  British Library,  UK Shakespeare Collections.

Links:  Shakespeare in Performance:
Stage History
Current and Forthcoming Shakespeare Productions
Current and Forthcoming Renaissance Drama Productions
Traffic of the Stage
Designing Shakespeare
RSC Archive - Pictures and Exhibitions
Library of Congress Federal Theatre Project
Biographical Index to the Elizabethan Theater
ReviewsGate.com
Shakespeare's Staging
  (Performance bibliographies, images and videos. Produced by the University of  California at Berkeley).    
                      Maintained by: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Last updated: August 24, 2009.


Q.   CANADA SPACE
         History of the Globe Theatre

 Shakespeare Staging 
http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/
The albums contain items such as playbills, photos and drawings of performances, and photos of the rebuilt Globe Theatre. ... All of the key figures in stage history are collected here,

R. The Shakespeare Quartos Archive

Affiliated Institutions:  Bodleian Library, of the University of Oxford; Folger Shakespeare Library; University of Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities; British Library; University of Edinburgh Library; Huntington Library; National Library of Scotland; Shakespeare Institute of the University of Birmingham
Funding Agencies:  Joint Information Systems Committee & National Endowment for the Humanities: JISC/NEH Transatlantic Digitization Collaboration Grant.

Links of Interest
: These sites may be of interest to users of the Shakespeare Quartos Archive. This list of is not meant to be exhaustive. You’ll find that most of these sites provide links to additional useful resources.
 
    Page images and transcriptions of online:
    * Folger Shakespeare Library Quartos
    * The Internet Shakespeare Editions (ISE)
    * Rare Book Room: The Quartos of William Shakespeare
    * Shakespeare in Quarto
   
      Guidance for teachers & students of plays of Shakespeare:

    * CPD for teachers (Royal Shakespeare Company)
    * Play-by-Play: Teaching Shakespeare (Folger Education)
    *  Shakespeare Online: Themes in Tragedy, from Britain in Print
   
      Theatrical production:
    * The Afterlife (British Library)
    * The American Shakespeare Center
    * Shakespeare’s Globe
   
* Shakespeare’s Staging (University of California, Berkeley)
    * Mr. William Shakespeare and the Internet: Theatre

 

S. Welcome to the Library Service Center of Baden-Württemberg

You have access here to the research literature on online catalog of the Southwest German Library Network of Baden-Württemberg, Saarland, Saxony, with approximately 14 million titles from 1200 libraries in Baden-Württemburg, Saarland, Saxony, and other specialist libraries in other German states.

English Studies: bibliographies and online databases:

Shakespeare Staging: "a survey of current information, opinions and visuals about...the original nature of Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter."

 

 

T. GOOGLE CUSTOM SEARCH

Theatre: searches some of the best theatre websites including:

 http://www.library.illinois.edu

 http://www.folger.edu/*,

 http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu [= shakespearestaging]

 http://www.infomotions.com/alex

 

Last updated: September 28, 2009

  

U. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT IRVINE 

 A Midsummer Night’s Dream:Resources for Students

 

      A. The BBC version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream through UCI Libraries

      B. A Midsummer Night's Dream (1981) Director Elijah Moshinsky

      C. Diana Rigg & Helen Mirren III.ii in Peter  Hall’s famous production from 1968.

     D. Shakespeare's Staging - Berkeley:                                               

      E. Searchable Shakespeare

 

 

V. New Hope-Solebury High School Library

       Shakespeare and the Renaissance:

        http://shakespeare.berkeley.edu/|Shakespeare Staging

This Web site is designed to provide a survey of current information, opinions, and visuals about Shakespeare in performance. It explores the original nature of the Shakespearean performance during his lifetime, and of its development through four centuries thereafter.

 

 

W.  SOUTHERN VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

Shakespeare - Research Guide                                               

Melissa Davis: Public Services Librarian &Christopher Richardson: Instructional Services Librarian

Recommended Web-Pages: 

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare http://shakespeare.mit.edu/

The Shakespeare Quartos Archive http://www.quartos.org/

Internet Shakespeare Editions http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/

Folger Shakespeare Library http://www.folger.edu

Shakespeare’s Staging (U.C. Berkeley) http://shakesperestaging.berkeley.edu

Shakespeare Illustrated http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_index.cfm

Shakespeare’s Globe Theater http://aspirations.english.cam.ac.uk/

Shakespeare on Television: http://chass.utoronto.ca/emls/06-1/diazbibl.htm

Shakespeare Around the Globe http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca

Criticism Early Editors of Shakespeare http://pages.unibas.ch/

 

X. Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning Online      

     MERLOT: California State University Cathy Swift, Chancellor's Office 

                       

    Shakespeare's Staging

      Hugh Macrae Richmond, University of California Berkeley

 

According to Shakespeare Quarterly, "Put together by Hugh Richmond of University of California at Berkeley, Staging Shakespeare has two explicit goals: 1) to enrich pedagogy through a vast collection of images and videos related to performances of Shakespeare’s work; and 2) to facilitate research on Shakespeare performance through an extensive bibliography divided chronologically and by play. The site also documents the history and performances of the Shakespeare program at UCB. As an archive, Staging Shakespeare assembles a rich array of visual materials. Images are helpfully organized into albums: for instance, within the gallery “Introduction to Shakespeare Staging,” users can browse “The Historical Context of Shakespeare Staging,” which contains photos of Hampton Court Hall, contemporary illustrations of the Globe and a map of sixteenth-century London. Other galleries show the diachronic changes in stage blocking, set design and actors for specific performances dating back four centuries."


Y. Meridian School: The Meridian School is an independent Kindergarten through fifth grade school. We are located in the historic heart of Seattle.

Recommended Web Resources

Teacher Resources

Shakespeare's Staging - a survey from the U. C. Berkeley's English Dept.

 

 

Z. SHAKESPEARE QUARTERLY 61.3 (Fall, 2010), 391-400.

In “Disciplining the Digital Humanities, 2010,” Whitney Trettien scrutinizes five important websites, from university-funded archives to Bardbox, a blog-based gallery of original Shakespeare videos. She casts an experienced digital humanist’s eye on their contents and platforms, how their data are structured, and how we navigate and use them. Katherine Rowe Guest Editor.

 

Disciplining Digital Humanities, 2010: Staging Shakespeare, XMAS, Shakespeare Performance in Asia, Shakespeare Quartos Archive, BardBox

Whitney Anne Trettien, Duke University

 

Staging Shakespeare:  http://shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu/ University of California, Berkeley

 

Put together by Hugh Richmond of University of California at Berkeley, Staging Shakespeare has two explicit goals: 1) to enrich pedagogy through a vast collection of images and videos related to performances of Shakespeare’s work; and 2) to facilitate research on Shakespeare performance through an extensive bibliography divided chronologically and by play. The site also documents the history and performances of the Shakespeare program at UCB.


0

As an archive, Staging Shakespeare assembles a rich array of visual materials. Images are helpfully organized into albums: for instance, within the gallery “Introduction to Shakespeare Staging,” users can browse “The Historical Context of Shakespeare Staging,” which contains photos of Hampton Court Hall, contemporary illustrations of the Globe and a map of sixteenth-century London. Other galleries show the diachronic changes in stage blocking, set design and actors for specific performances dating back four centuries. Although not organized into galleries, the videos are captioned with didactic, contextualizing descriptions written for a student audience and include not only Shakespeare performance (as well as a full staging of Much Ado About Nothing) but documentaries on the political and social culture of Elizabethan times. Since permissions have been secured or the material is already owned by the Shakespeare Program, instructors and students are free to use the images and video for educational purposes.

 

Beyond access to the materials, though – many of which are low resolution – the website offers few functionalities. Students are unable to sort, save or search across images or their descriptions, thereby restricting their application to a fairly narrow set of predetermined lesson plans. Similarly, the Gallery display software used seems to limit the metadata categories attached to each object, so that a photo’s provenance, date and author are often unclear. Unfortunately, the video collection is even more unintuitive. Built using Seyret, a clunky (and – it must be said – downright ugly) video component for the Content Management System (CMS) Joomla, clips are stored within one unhelpful category (“Shakespeare videos”), and the search function is, at the time of this writing, broken. While no doubt many of these functionalities will be fixed, expanded and tweaked as the site progresses, early decisions to contain all media within Gallery and Joomla, as opposed to Flickr, YouTube or a feed-syndicated CMS like WordPress, have already limited the site’s potential to a few scripted actions. If these criticisms seem to cavil over technological details – especially when the site’s guestbook overflows with praise from visitors who would otherwise never have access to these materials – it is important to underscore that software, database structures and metadata schemas are not neutral, objective  systems.

 

                                                            RESPONSE

Whitney Trettien’s notice of our UCB website about Shakespeare Staging in “Disciplining Digital Humanities” is accurate and balanced, with valid praise and criticism. We have indeed stressed content and clarity above all, as the materials presented are too often inaccessible and buried in unshaped, un-annotated collections requiring months of research, selection, and permissions to secure. We have attempted to identify all images and sources, but further annotation continues. Our principles of organization are deliberately familiar: historical categories with alphabetical content by play-title. The site has been praised by users for its simple and traditional structure; other, more sophisticated sites in our field are often hard to master and adapt.
 Advanced and elegant technology cannot be readily afforded and only low-resolution images are usually permitted for open access. So our technical repertoire has to be very modest, based on a budget of under $15,000 over five years for establishing and developing the site, and $100 per month to maintain it currently. This cost was largely covered by royalties from our video documentaries that also provide our site’s video clips - which are on YouTube, a link that will be developed. This funding is insufficient to establish a video collection involving complexities of selection, access, and copyright, but we are upgrading site formats including the Video Gallery. The Trettien review is written with high technological expectations rather than with a sense of the limited options, needs, and resources available to the creators and users of data about Shakespeare performance. It appears that elaborate educational programming is not required by our users: the comments cited above, from students, teachers , and scholars, suggest that their own applications are already effective and diversified in using our material. Since we have now reached a total of well over one million page visits, our procedures seem valid.  We are most grateful for the recognition in SQ.        

   Hugh Richmond, Director,   Shakespeare Program, U.C.B.






  alt

 The title of our DVD on Anglo/Hispanic drama in our Video Gallery.


NEWEST COMMENTS

 

 

    SHAKESPEARE QUARTOS ARCHIVE

 

      Lead Institutions: Bodleian Library, of the University of Oxford (Richard Ovenden, UK project director); Folger Shakespeare Library (S. Enniss, US project co-director, 2009); Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, U. of Maryland (N. Fraistat, US project co-director).

 

       Partner InstitutionsBritish Library; University of Edinburgh Library; Huntington Library: National Library of Scotland; Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

 

      Funding Agencies: Joint Information Systems; National Endowment for the Humanities 

 

These sites may be of interest to users of the Shakespeare Quartos Archive.  These sites provide links to additional useful resources:

 

 

Guidance for teachers and students of Hamlet and other plays of Shakespeare:


 Central Michigan University

         SHAKESPEARE LINKS AND GENERAL STUDY SITES:
 

** THE BEST **

 

·  Mr. William Shakespeare and the Internet -- your best first stop; an outstanding clearinghouse of Shakespeare sites by Prof. Terry Gray, expert on Internet Shakespeare

 

·  A Selected Guide to Shakespeare on the Internet by Hardy Cook and the editors of -- recently updated and annotated

 

·  SparkNotes -- an online study guide by Harvard grad students -- very efficient and useful

 

·  Bardweb.com -- The Shakespeare Resource Center -- not a lot of material, but what's here is well-written -- also contains a page of play synopses and a good, brief bio of Shakespeare.

 

·  Shakespeare Online: Your Ultimate Shakespeare Resource -- although this site doesn't offer analysis of all the plays, one of the best-written and most attractive study sites.

 

·  Internet Shakespeare: Home Page -- Very attractive site with a terrific "Life and Times" section and a well-organized links page.

 

·  NEW: Shakespeare's Staging -- UC Berkeley's invaluable database/resources about Shakespeare productions and theater history.

 


TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY, CORPUS CHRISTI

RESOURCE GUIDE: THEATRE

Internet Resources

 Motley Collection of Theatre & Costume Design: Coverage: 1970’s to the present. Description of items on costuming and set design, some general theatre writings.
 Arts and Humanities Citation Index Coverage: 1975 to present: Citations of articles provided by Web of Knowledge..
 MLA Bibliography Coverage: 19th C. to the present. Large collection on the Arts, with theatre & performing arts. http://images.library.uiuc.edu/projects/motley/               Stagework – Royal National Theatre http://www.stagework.org.uk Description: Royal National Theatre UK developed this resource about acting, dramaturgy, staging, costuming, & performing arts.
  SHAKESPEARE'S STAGING http://shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu/ University of California – Berkeley’s site for information, resources and bibliographies on the staging of Shakespearian works throughout history.           
MIT
CourseWare – Music and Theater Arts http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/music-and-theater-arts/ Description: Resources in courses at MIT: theory, bibliographies, streams.  Lort League of Resident Theatres http://www.lort.org/  The “largest Professional Theatre Organization in U.S.” Data on work, agreements and contracts for professional theatre.  Actor’s Equity http://actorsequity.org/  Info. on USA actor unionization: bargaining agreements and benefits & links with the AFL-CIO.

INDIANA UNIVERSITY - PURDUE UNIVERSITY (Fort Wayne)
Performance Index:
Here is the fine website from Cal-Berkeley, Shakespeare's Staging

Name: Denbli: Good day. I just wanted to say that you created a really great site.   Thanks!

Saint Joseph's Catholic High School , South Bend, Indiana
Julius Caesar Acting Company
Great resource: http://shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu/

Your site looks fantastic and I shall be directing my own students towards it.
Dr. Jonathan Pstrick, St. Paul's Girls' School, Hammersmith, London


Current Visitors to Shakespearestaging by Country %

USA: 36.2%  India: 9.2%  China: 3.5%  UK: 3.4% Germany: 3.0%  Canada: 2.4% Pakistan: 2.2%  France: 2.2% Japan: 1.8%

Webstatsdomain.com - is a free online service that collects information about domains and keywords

Webstats Overview of Shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu

Shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu is ranked 2,136 in the world, among 30 million domains: this rank means that this website gets lots of visitors. This site is relatively popular among users in the United States. It gets 41.1% from the United States. This site is estimated worth $1,591,796. USD. This site also has a high Page Rank of 6/10 with 75,904 backlinks. Webstats Rating: ★★★★✩ It also has a very good rating score for a seo website: Shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu has a 66% seo score.

GOOGLE SEARCH RANKINGS for “Shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu”

Listed first of 37,600,000 under “shakespeare performance”

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Listed first of 1,370,000 results under “Staging King Lear

Listed first of 1,360,000 results under “Staging Richard III"

Listed first of 1,140,000 results under “Staging Romeo & Juliet"

Listed first of 688,000 results under “Staging  Othello"

Listed first of 411,000 results under “Staging Much Ado"

Listed first of 411,000 results under “Staging  Macbeth"

Listed thirty-first of 28,500,000 results under “shakespeare”                               9/4/12
 

 

Joe’s Blog Tuesday, November 20, 2012

This blog aims to support all those business aficionados within the Secondary School System in Ireland both teachers and students alike. It provides a wide range of helpful supports from useful links, interesting videos to the latest business and economic travails from around the globe. I hope you find the Blog helpful and helps you achieve your goals.

Staging of Romeo and Juliet [in shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu]

One of the principal implications of the following entries, and the relevant illustrative material in the Performance Galleries, is that each age stages and perceives the character of Shakespeare’s plays as refracted through its own values and conventions, not just in terms of religious, political, social and aesthetic values, but even in terms of acceptable costumes and scenery. The effects of such refractions of the texts usually involve drastic cuts, emendations, and re-editing. This type of modification has long been identified in such periods as the Restoration, with its reinforcement of neoclassical norms, such as the unities of time, place and action, and the preference for purity of genres such as tragedy and comedy. However, it is now generally perceived that, while the nineteenth century restored much of the original scripts to the stage, these more authentic versions had still to be trimmed severely to accommodate handling of the complex, historically elaborate scenery then fashionable. Act V of Beerbohm Tree’s Henry VIII disappeared entirely
http://shakespearestaging.berkeley.edu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=16&Itemid=192








 


 

 

 


 
 
 
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